THE STORY OF MEREDITH BARBER, RGIII’S (COMPLETELY FAKE, LYING, FICTIONAL) SIDE CHICK

It wasn’t that long ago that Richard Hurd, a 26 year old former member of the Baylor men’s basketball team, tried to extort Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III. The harsh reality of life in the NFL is that one way or another, people will try to exploit you somehow. Luckily for RGIII, Hurd was caught, charged, and received 18 months in prison after his extortion attempt.

Since she didn’t try to extort RGIII personally, Meredith Barber likely won’t have to deal with any jail time. However, she will have to deal with a lot of embarrassment.

Last week, the website Busted Coverage posted a story referring to Meredith Barber as RGIII’s “side piece”, and accused Griffin of texting her on his wedding day. While the story didn’t get much attention nationally (it did wind up on Deadspin), it did cause a mini-panic attack in Redskins Nation over the franchise quarterback potentially cheating on his new bride.

Allow me to sooth those fears by telling you that they’re a straight up lie.

Thanks to a lot of tireless work from Richard Bruno (a.k.a @RedskinsRich on Twitter), we have a much clearer picture of here Meredith Barber actually. Namely, that she’s not RGIII’s side piece, but another misguided human being hoping to profit on the kindness of others.

I think it’s fair to say this starts with a friend of Robert Griffin III, William Mallow, and RGIII’s desire to play wing man for his buddy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Meredith Barber who initiates contact with William Mallow by following him.

 

 

Barber follows up contact with Mallow by tweeting that she and Mallow are going to go see RGIII soon, which he retweets. RGIII doesn’t respond.

 

 

This is the one tweet that Rich could find with RGIII ever mentioning Barber, and this is just in passing while Barber and Mallow flirt it up.

 

 

More flirting…

 

 

Still more flirting…

 

 

From September through November, Mallow and Barber share these kind of flirty Tweets back in forth. Then, in October, Mallow hooks Barber up with an autographed picture from Robert Griffin III.

 

Busted Coverage also posted this picture of tickets Barber allegedly got from RGIII —

Intrepid Redskins fans as well as our own LL quickly pointed that the above tickets are not player tickets, but regular season tickets. It’s also fair to think that, given the relationship between Barber and Mallow, the “he” Barber is referring to isn’t RGIII, but Mallow. Below is a complete gallery of conversations between Mallow and Barber on Twitter.

                  

                                        

                 

                                        

                 

                 

                 

This appears to be a case of RGIII playing wing man for his guy, and one girl getting a tiny bit caught up. Meredith started the wheels turning with what she would later claim was a joke by a  friend.

Busted Coverage picked up on the tip, and then started to extrapolate a fictional account of what happened. Barber even initially comes clean about some things.

But it also seems apparent that Barber realized she had something on her hands after Joe Kinsey pushes her a little.

Ask yourself this; what’s a more likely story? That Robert Griffin III, on his wedding day no less, texted Meredith Barber, and Barber then turned around and tweeted about it, blowing her and RGIII’s cover on a whim because she was super jealous?

Or…

That RGIII was just being a good dude for his friend and helping him out by giving her an autograph, maybe Facetiming with her (even though we here are HTTR24-7.com all swear we saw one of those pictures during our run in with a certain red-haired catfish). That William Mallow bought her tickets and used his relationship with Griffin III for his own attempts to date her. And that Barber told a bad joke that got picked up on by Buster Coverage, and upon realizing her situation, Barber saw an opportunity to take advantage?

Barber wasn’t even the only girl Mallow would use his relationship with RG3 on….

In today’s media culture, being first is always preferable to being right. The reason this story gained no traction nationally is because it’d take all of five minutes for another blog to confirm something like this.

Busted Coverage got a hot tip on a potential story, and basically said “screw being right, think of the clicks an ad revenue.” Which is a trait a lot of internet blogs have.

Barber saw the post, and initially probably tried to do the right thing. But once it became clear money was involved, it wasn’t hard for Barber to realize that she could profit off tarnishing Robert Griffin III’s reputation.

Mallow did confront Barber, and he did put his explanation of events out there.

Look I’m going to cut through the BS and just get down to it. We both know that Meredith is looking for attention/money. I know this is what you do for a living and you thought that this would be a golden opportunity but the fact of the matter is that this is completely false. I was with Robert the night in question, and there was zero texting of other girls, much less selfie stomach shots. That isn’t even close to what the bathroom of the suite we were in looked like.

It’s completely unfair to crucify a guy who is a role model to hundreds of thousands of people because all he’s done from day 1 is the right thing. The guy didn’t take a SIP of alcohol during the entire time of the bachelor party in Vegas the weekend before. He’s completely committed and in love with his wife, and would never jeopardize that.

If you want any further information or proof, please let me know. I also have screenshots of Meredith yesterday admitting to me via texts that this was all a joke and that someone grabbed her phone

As for those Facetime Photos, Rich Bruno explains those as well.

There are five photos attached to the email to help me show and explain to you the method I used while analyzing Meredith’s photos. I took the two RGIII FaceTime photos directly from BustedCoverage, In order to disprove RGIII spoke with Meredith I used Error Layer Analysis which is a part of Image Forensics. Below is an explanation for ELA.

Error Level Analysis (ELA) is an algorithm that evaluates the error level potential of a JPEG image. JPEG is a lossy image format; every re-save degrades the picture. The amount of degradation varies based on the number of saves. The first save loses a lot, the second save loses a little more, and by the 20th save, it is probably as low quality as it will ever get. When a picture is modified, the changed parts have a higher error level potential than the rest of the image. ELA works by saving the picture at a known quality level (like a JPEG at 95%), and then determines how much changed. Edits and splices appear as regions with more change. See the tutorial for more detail.

To summarize, ELA is a method to analyze the distortion or change done to a photo. A photo can degrade by a simple save with more saving leading to more degradation. When you change a photo in Photoshop, you are degrading the original image and adding something with its own respective characteristics. When a photo goes through Photoshop, the changes leave a hidden trail to show what was once done to the image. ELA takes the photo and analyzes it for this error potential highlighting any areas which are effected. The highlights notorious for Photoshop include a rainbow like feature over the image or white noise where an image has undergone a change. In each RGIII FaceTime photo, the white noise corresponding to Photoshop shows up on Meredith’s face and information showing a doctored image. It is not unique to her white face or a white background with some black or consistent pattern included. The images have color yet are completely covered by the white noise. To further prove this, the Busted Coverage logo is also white noise while RGIII and everything else in the image maintains its integrity shown by the black. You can see this in both pictures.

To help explain, I attached Explanation Images 1 and 2. Image 1 is a picture of a Pomeranian which was analyzed and has a resulting all black image showing its original characteristics. There have been no changes to this image.

Explanation image 2 is a Photoshop image of RGIII celebrating with the Lombardi trophy (I can’t wait until this becomes real life in February). The image, sadly, is a fake. You can see in the image how everything in it is black except for the Lombardi and RGIII’s jersey. The jersey was a Baylor jersey changed to Redskins colors.

One last image attached is a FaceTime control used to show the results expressed here are not generic for all FaceTime photos. I took a real life, unaltered FaceTime image and also analyzed it. As seen in the attached image, there is a smooth and consistent pattern. There are no drastic or heavy white signals.

This technique is all about discrepancies and out of the norm items. If an image does not flow smoothly, one can draw conclusions a change has occurred. It does not tell you what type of change or specific details, but if you know what you are looking for, it is perfect. This does prove the images she has provided are fake; therefore, I expect everything else she has yet to reveal to be fake as well.

In addition to what I’ve stated, each picture provided to Busted Coverage lacks its original EXIF data which is a virtual thumbprint. Images lacking this origin data are notorious for being Photoshop projects as well.

For Robert Griffin III, this is an unfortunate lesson on what you can and can’t do with friends. For all intents and purposes, Griff did nothing wrong but try to help friends out, and clearly Mallow was a good enough friend that he was in his wedding party. That being said, sometimes it’s better to exercise discretion, even when you’re trying to hook a homeboy.

 

For William Mallow, it probably means a little less using his relationship with Robert Griffin III to impress people. Girls that hit you up on Twitter are worthy of a little more scrutiny when you happen to be the very close friend of the guy who is quickly becoming the biggest, most famous athlete in sports.

 

And for Meredith Barber, the best thing she can do at this point is just come clean. If she’s a real Washington Redskins fan, she knows how much Griff has meant to this city and this team in the short time he’s been here. If she wants to come clean to HTTR24-7.com, I promise I’ll try to be as fair as possible. If she wants to come clean on her own, that’s fine as well.

 

But she needs to come clean. And quickly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALL-22: BREAKING DOWN ALFRED MORRIS VS THE DALLAS COWBOYS

Twitter and the message boards have buzzed about: Whats wrong with Alfred Morris? Well we have plenty of time to talk about it but let’s take an All-22 look at Alfred Morris in the run game vs the Dallas Cowboys.

– Read Option: Morris follows the lead blocks of Paulsen and Young.

– Ware chases Morris down from behind. Gain of 3 yards on the play.

– Pistol: Outside Zone (stretch)- Morris will track the outside hip of Young until he finds a lane to cut up-field. Chester is suppose to block and seal Lee off to the inside. Polumbus gets beat to the inside off the snap of the ball.

– Lee beats Chester to the outside to fill the run lane, Morris tries to bounce to the sideline.

– Lee cuts down Morris at the line of scrimmage. Morris could have picked up more yards on the play had Chester blocked his assignment. Morris gain of 0.

– Pistol: Read Option look but a designed run call to Morris.

– Morris is being blocked by the camera, but trust me he is there. I wanted to show this image because of the cut block by Morgan, he gets it done for a WR, position switch? The blocking scheme leaves the Cowboys best run defender unblocked..? Not to sure about this one.

– Morris tries to get front-side but is brought down by Lee before he gets to the hole. Gain of 3.

– Base Under Center: Outside zone (Stretch)- Morris is suppose to track the outside hip of Reed until he finds his lane to get up-field. Trent will search and seal Lee to the inside while Reed and Davis Seal the defenders to the sideline. What I like about this play is Reed and Davis are actually on the field together so lets see how they do.

– Reed and Davis get the job done sealing the outside.Morris gets up-field and picks up 9 yards.

– Pistol: Inside Zone-  OL works combo blocks on the DT’s. Reed is matched up 1 on 1 with Ware.

– Lee flashes in the hole and Reed is beat inside by Ware, Morris is dead to rights at this point. Gain of 0.

– Base Under Center Morris will take the pitch and follow Young through the hole.

– OL does a great job of giving Morris a lane to cut into. Young looks to seal Lee to the outside. Ware is in pursuit from the backside.

– Lee sheds Young and assists Ware in taking down Morris for a gain of 3.

– Base:Under Center Outside Zone (Stretch)- We won’t know what Morris could have done o this play because Kory lichtensteiger gets beat off the snap.

– Hatcher brings down Morris for a loss of 4. You never know how a play will turn out, but this looks like it had some potential.

– Shotgun: HB  Draw – OL opens a crease for Morris and he has blockers on the second level.

– Morris should be through the hole already and working the FS, but instead he stutter steps, then he cuts towards T.Polumbus.

– Morris gets tackled for a gain of 0.

– Pistol:Read Option – This play looks like Read Option but is a predetermined run call for Morris.

– Morris sees the CB flash off his right side and cuts backside.  Polumbus didn’t have enough time to reach his block on #54 B.Carter.Carter makes the play on Morris for a gain of 2.

– Base: Under Center Outside Zone (Stretch)- OL does a good job of sealing of the defense.

– Morris sees the lane early, and he cuts up-field once the DE flashes on Polumbus’s outside shoulder. The lane is small but one an NFL RB can work for positive yardage.

– Morris weaves through the lane and is in position to break a long run, just has to find another gear.

– Morris can’t hit that the next gear and is tracked down by the DE for a gain of 5. I like these plays from Morris and will never complain about gaining positive yardage, but I do think there can be more yardage gained on plays like these by a guy with a little more explosion.

– Base Under Center: Same play that they ran earlier in the game. Interior OL doubles the DT’s, single on the DE’s with Reed & Polumbus. Normally the interior OL will combo block the DT’s then 1 will peel and reach the LB’s on the second level.  Reed looses inside leverage on the snap of the football.

– Morris feels the DE pushing off his left and cuts into the backside hole created by Chester and Polumbus.

– Morris is tracked down by the DE before he can get to the hole. A better block by Reed, or a little more burst from Morris and this play could have been a lot different. Gain of 2 on this play.

– Base Under Center: Outside Zone (Stretch)-  Chester gets pushed in the backfield on the snap by the offside DT. Morris tracks off the hip of Young.

– OL does a great job seal off the lane and Montgomery has hands on the LB at the top of the hole.

– Alfred gets to the top of the hole with a two-way go, breaks two arm tackles on his way to a 45 yard TD.

– Pistol: Read Option- Paulsen and Young come across the formation, Paulsen works a “bluff” block on the DE.

– DE has too much momentum and hits Morris in the backfield. Morris takes the contact and still picks up a 3 yard gain.

Alfred Morris finished the day with 16 carries for 81 yards and a 5.06 average. I thought he went as the Offensive line went, which can probably be said for a lot of Running Backs in the NFL. At times he displayed the patience, decision making, and power he’s known for, other times he pressed  a little, and lacked the speed to pick up yards that were available. Perfection is rare in this league, and Morris isn’t perfect but he is productive.

I felt Morris had a better day in the traditional run game rather than the zone read. Think the zone read game was forced a little too much in the first half vs the Cowboys, but that could just be me. Thanks for reading!

ALL-22: BREAKDOWNS IN THE DALLAS DEFENSE PLAY TO THE REDSKINS STRENGTHS

Over the last few days I’ve been asked a lot of questions, but one has been asked the most: How do you beat the Cowboys defense? That’s an easy one for me to answer, test their LB discipline and Safety talent early and often. So far through 5 games the LB’s are over aggressive in the run game which leaves them vulnerable to the play action pass, and the Safeties have been caught out of position while allowing big plays.Washington had a lot of success vs Dallas in 2012 relying on a strong run game, and play action passing that lead to explosive plays. Look for Washington to do the same Sunday Night in Dallas VS the Cowboys.

I sent out a tweet earlier in the day saying “Robert will go off this week” and as I expected it was met with skepticism. But lets use the ALL-22 to look at the Cowboys defensive issues and how they could help the Redskins offense find its comfort zone.

Personnel: Regular (2 WR- 1TE-2RB)

Defense: Cover 3

-Giants use weak side play action to open up the strong side post route by baiting the LB’s towards the Line of scrimmage. Dallas is showing cover 2 pre-snap but will rotate into cover 1 post snap.

-The top WR gets a fast outside release , this makes the CB have to turn and run with the WR since he can’t funnel him inside to the safety. The CB to the bottom of screen keeps his outside leverage and pushes the WR toward the has and his Safety help. The problem on this play is the LB’s and SS have sold out on Giants run action, leaving their secondary exposed for a big play.

-The QB sits in a clean pocket while the WR breaks into the open field… This should look very familiar to Redskins fans.

-The WR catches the ball in space and takes it 57 yards.
Personnel: Posse (3 WR- 1TE-1RB)
Defense: Cover 2

-Giants use weak side play action to bait & pull the LB’s toward the line of scrimmage. Safeties have deep 1/2 responsibilities and get to their drop points post snap. WR’s should be funneled to the inside hashes per the scheme rules.

– The Lb’s take the bait and charge the line of scrimmage, even the nickle CB -white Circle-took the bait and is now lost in coverage. The bottom CB pushed the WR inside post -snap but has no underneath help from the LB’s.

– The QB has not one, but two wide open WR’s over the middle of the field. He chooses the bottom WR for an easy 17 yard completion.
Personnel: Posse (3 WR- 1TE-2RB)
Defense: 2 deep man under

– Simple play with a Go/Post combination.. The CB’s run into each-other trying to switch on the WR’s and there is no interior coverage support.

– Another easy spot throw for the QB to a WR in open space.

– Randle hauls in the pass for 22 yards.
Personnel: Posse (3 WR- 1TE-1RB)
Defense: Good Question..Quarters?

-Giants run a Dig/Fly combination vs a defense I can’t identify 100 %, looks like quarters but whatever it was they blew it.

– The Safety pulls a Madieu Williams and comes down too shallow on the WR, He has to open his hips to run with the WR but it’s too late and the QB knows it. The QB rolls to his right to avoid pressure and to buy time to get the ball down-field.

-The WR split the coverage and the QB finds him for an easy TD. He also had the dig route wide open as well…
Personnel: Posse (3 WR- 1TE-1RB)
Defense: Cover 2

– This concept is all about the WR in the slot VS the OLB in coverage. The concept is for the WR to read how the LB gets depth & width in his coverage drop. The WR will bend his route right behind the LB if he gets too wide & doesn’t get enough depth to close the hole to the Safety.
This video is a great explanation of the route & coverage concept

-LB is his drop but you can see the void opening in the defense. The QB can make this completion if he gets the time to make the pass.

-WR bends to the open space behind the LB and in front of the Safety.

– The QB even places the ball perfectly on the back shoulder to protect his WR from the charging Safety.
Personnel: Posse (3 WR- 1TE-1RB)
Defense: Cover 3

– Chiefs want to run off and spread out the LB coverage with this play concept that may look familiar to Redskins fans. The skins like to run the under slant to Garcon and Hankerson on third downs and in the red zone.

– The QB gets the snap and gets his shoulders turned strong side, seems like a simple movement but it helps pull the LB’s away from the middle of the field. The LB’s have to respect and get width/depth in their zone to protect the double vertical routes by the TE and slot WR. The WR will slant under the rub routes to the middle of the field.

-The QB resets towards his throwing lane over the outside hash. The LB is put in conflict with the under slant crossing his face & the vertical release, he has to maintain his depth and hope to rally to make the tackle on the under slant if it’s completed.

– The LB overruns the route and the WR walks in for an easy TD.
Personnel: Ace (2WR- 2TE-1RB)
Defense: Cover 1 man

-Chargers use Ace personnel but split the RB & TE out-wide giving them a four WR look. Dallas matches up in man coverage across the board.

– The FS has to get depth and stay over top both vertical routes, on this play he is late leaving the middle of the field and will only have time to get over one. The QB notices the FS hanging out and anticipates his RB coming open on the outside vertical.

– FS is late & the RB catches the ball at the goaline for a TD.

Personnel: Posse (3 WR- 1TE-1RB)
Defense: Cover 1

– Chargers run everyone to the goaline except their RB who is on a wheel route. Dallas drops in zone but the OLB will pick up the RB in man.

-LB gets on the inside hip of the RB while the WR’s run the coverage off to the endzone.

– The QB spots the RB entering an open window and lets it go.

– Lb looses the footrace and the QB hits the RB for 7.
Personnel: Posse (3 WR- 1TE-1RB)
Defense: Cover 3

-Chargers will run a two vertical concept with their WR & TE, The combination will test the FS’s ability to stay over top of both verticals.

-FS gets over top of the verticals but he is in a poor body position to make a play on both. The QB sees this, and goes to the TE on the vertical route in the middle of the field.

-The LB can’t hang with the TE and this is an easy TD without a FS able to make a play.
These are just a few examples of offenses taking advantage of the breakdowns in the Dallas defense, but they are breakdowns that play to the strengths of the Redskins offense. The question is will Robert Griffin III and the Redskins be able to take advantage of them on Sunday Night?

The Case Against DeAngelo Hall

This case is not meant to compel me. The case against MeAngelo was made for me when his teammates in his own locker room beat his ass in Atlanta. If that wasn’t telling enough, he was too cancerous for the Oakland Raiders organization. Please, let that wash over you. And, even if let’s say, a duck isn’t a duck, and he was tabula rasa upon his arrival at Redskins Park, I’d merely remind everyone of 9/28/2011. That’s not ancient history. That’s taking into account how he’s “changed”, assuredly. In case you don’t recall, that glorious September evening, let me paint the picture for you:

The Skins are on MNF against nemesis Dallas. Skins are 2-0, looking for control of NFC East. Tony Romo has cracked ribs. He throws for 0 TDs. The defense holds Dallas to 3rd and 21 late in the game. DeAngelo gives up a 30 yard 1st down to Dez, and gets flagged for a facemask, even after he was beaten. Cowboys kick a FG, Cowboys win. DeAngelo’s response was to blame Haz’s defensive playcalling, blame the ref for throwing the flag… Hell, I think he blamed global warming. This is the reflex response for MeAngelo, which is the opposite of what we need in this locker room.

But, like I said, a stroll down memory lane will not compel the Fredericksburgers. I know that. For the five seasons that he has infested the organization, his apologists have become Legion. I encounter them every day. Criticize DHall or, God forbid, mention cutting DHall and they go into a full body spasm. And their memory, or conceptualization of events, is like 3 weeks. Why is this? Why is this guy sacrosanct? Is it generational? Do these young’uns prefer a guy who’ll talk shit on a tackle, even after he’s missed the last five? Is it geographic? Will Skins fans support a guy from VPI or The 7-5-7, no matter what a turd he is? Is it his semi-celebrity status? I’m sure I’ll never understand. But, realizing that, I will try to make a compelling case to the apologists, strictly upon his performance in 2012-13. Here’s a week-by-week rundown of the season that was:

* This recitation of stats comes with the caveat that FSAAMT’s – “failed strip attempts after missed tackles” – were not included. Although valuable for this discussion, the PR Slappies at Redskins Park are only on Week 13’s tape. They hope to be done counting FSAAMT’s by the NFL Draft. Safe to say though, this is one category where D-Hall can proudly say he led the league.

Week 1

The self-titled “Ball Hawk” came out of camp, with the intent of filling the role of “Charles Woodson 2.0”. He did a decent job of filling that role in the opener in N’awlins. He was utilized as a pass rusher on 10 of 43 plays where he lined up in the slot. This resulted in a sack and three hurries of Drew Brees. The Saints were playing catch up most of the day, but the rushing DeAngelo was not an impediment to the team’s gameplan.

Week 2

Sam Bradford, 310 yards. Danny Amendola, 15 catches, 160 yards. So much of that was caused by the Rams’ abuse of our zone. But there is no doubt that DeAngelo Hall deserves a royalty for the millions he helped Amendola make that day. No doubt.

Week 3

On the first play from scrimmage, a guy who hadn’t thrown a pass since October of 2011 against the Syracuse Orangemen, hit A.J. Green for a 73-yard TD pass. Guess who was covering Green? Yes, I know. DeAngelo was quick to assert blame upon himself for giving up the play, but that doesn’t really help for me. The defense gave up 478 yards at home. The team lost by a touchdown. DeAngelo Hall’s touchdown.

Week 4

This game highlighted the poise of our rookie sensation RGIII, and the ineptitude of now departed kicker Billy Cundiff. What gets lost in those highlights is how the Buccaneers got back into this one. The home crowd was booing QB Josh Freeman in the 1st half. It was 21-6 Skins at half. That all changed when Vincent Jackson beat Hall, and Freeman hit him for a 65-yard gain, with the drive ending in a Bucs touchdown. RGIII and Cundiff saved a day that DHall desperately tried to give away.

Week 5

Through Week 5, DHall had given up 268 yards of offense to opposing teams. That was 7th worst in the NFL. This game was memorable for being the game in which RGIII was first hurt. It was reprehensible for the 123 yds given up to Tony G and the 94 surrendered to Julio Jones. 345 passing yards for Matty Ice. I can’t assign any specific blame on MeAngelo, but there was certainly nothing for the apologists to laud him for.

Week 6

This was the shining gem in the case against DeAngelo. If the Skins are dead-set on keeping Hall, they had better get him to restructure enough to also sign Percy Harvin, strictly in the off-chance that the Skins will have to play against him. Once again, whatever free agent money that Harvin receives should come with a clause assigning royalties to D-Hall. Of the nine passes Hall was targeted on while defending Harvin, he gave up six receptions for 102 yards. To add insult to injury, he also missed five tackles. The worst of those came late in the fourth quarter, when Percy turned a 4-yd catch into a 22-yd gain at the expense of DeAngelo’s failure to tackle him. Once again, this wart was covered up by the phenomenon known as RGIII, but not to me. If we have to move forward in the future sans Robert, we can’t have this wart on the roster.

Week 7

There is so much blame that can be placed upon Madieu Williams for his failure on the Victor Cruz TD, that there really isn’t anything that’s left for DHall. But, alas, he helped me out.

“He made the play to beat us, but I don’t feel like he made that play. I feel we gave him that play. We just had one guy set his feet and one guy not do this. I could have thrown that ball and he would have scored. It wasn’t something where he was a rocket scientist and he figured something out. We just played that as bad as possible.”

Those were DeAngelo’s postgame comments. Of course, he wasn’t in coverage on the play, so when he says “we”, he really means “Madieu”. I don’t disagree with the overall sentiment of the statement, but throwing your teammate under the bus hardly seems helpful. Not realizing that is so typical of MeAngelo.

Week 8

DeAngelo got ejected. DeAngelo got fined $30,000. This is a favorite of the apologists, as is every other episode involving Hall and an official, and they have become nearly countless. The retort that it was “the official’s fault” is always the same. I’m less sick of Hall blaming the refs than I am of the Fredericksburgers always falling for that line.

But, okay. Fine. I’ll surrender to the fantasy that the referee was a member of the Klan, and Roger Goodell is complicit in systemic racism. Only involving a washed up 1st-round pick from VaTech, of course, but… okay. We’ll just throw the ejection and tirade and fine out of the conversation.

Through Week 7, MeAngelo had allowed 521 yards of offense to our opponents. Yes, for those counting, that was worst among CBs. Things didn’t improve in Picksburg. The Stillers’ second play
of the game had DHall bite on a fake wide receiver screen, opening up TE Heath Miller. MeAngelo was beaten on five of seven passes for 73 yards, and 60 of those came after the catch. Just pitiful.

Week 9

Through the first half of the season, D-Hall was giving up 1.83 yards/coverage snap, and was the fourth worst CB in the NFL in surrendering YAC. This is the guy the Fredericksburgers want to move to FS.

Bye Week (Week 10)

DeAngelo tells Mike Jones that Coach Haslett conducted one-on-one interviews with several defensive players. When asked about the meetings, Hall denies knowledge and blames Jones. Jones plays back audio of the quote, and D-Hall decides that he wants to assault a Washington Post reporter. He’s reported as saying, “anybody touches me, I’m knocking them out.” So, to his credit, he has been aggressive with a referee in Pittsburgh, some PR Slappies, and a J-Schooler in Ashburn, but zero opposing receivers. Excellent.

Week 11

This was a spectacular on-field game for D-Hall. He, along with the rest of the secondary, were truly inspired by the return of Brandon Meriweather. Their play was reflective of his play. I don’t know what this says about Meriweather, but I am hopeful that he is able to return.

Week 12

Thanksgiving game at Big D. D-Hall gets an interception of a ball that only could have been thrown by Tony Romo. He also gives up merely 36 yards on 5 passes defended. But, the whole thing could have turned out differently. Hall “punched” Dez Bryant in his facemask. If any of these racist, unfair referees had been paying any attention to Bryant and Hall’s little bitch fight, Hall would’ve surely been ejected. That’s okay for a second year WR, but unacceptable for a nine-year veteran, who formerly wore the defensive team captain’s “C” on his chest. In spite of the officials giving him a pass, the league fined him $37,500 for his actions. Well done, sir.

Week 13

The story of this day was RGIII, who broke Cam Newton’s year-old rookie QB rushing record. The defense held Eli & Co. to 6 points in the 2nd half, and the Skins won. There’s really nothing bad to be said about any of their performances, including Hall.

Week 14

DeAngelo, although not listed on the injury report, showed up midweek for a radio interview on crutches. He decided to play on Sunday against dem Raybins. I wish that he wouldn’t have. He, once again, played starmaker, this time for Anquan Boldin. Boldin caught two touchdowns against Hall. Banner day. To top that off, Hall had a terribly timed missed tackle in run defense, coupled with an unnecessary roughing penalty. It was one of his single-worst games on record. Another wart covered up by Ray Rice’s fumble, and RGIII/Kirk Cousins.

Week 15

Through week 15, D-Hall ranks 96th in the league giving up a reception every 8.3 times in coverage. 96th!!! That’s our guy. He also allowed the ninth-most Yards Per Snap in Coverage, at 1.73. I don’t think that I need to add anything to that.

Brandon Weeden made the entire Redskin secondary look all-pro.

Week 16

Even with Weeden’s help, through week 16, DeAngelo had allowed the second most yards per coverage snap, at 1.7. Against the Iggles, Hall allows yet another receiver to have a banner day: Jeremy Maclin going for 58 yds matched up against him.

Week 17

Here’s the week the Fredericksburgers love to cite. D-Hall shut down Dez. I’ve heard it more than Gangnam Style. Guess what: back spasms shut down Dez. But, it’s cool… D-Hall is an NFC East Champion, and so are the Redskins!!! Hail!!!

Wild Card Week

Well, the Seahawks utilized the run to upend the NFC East Champs. In doing so, many Redskins were horrendous at missing tackles and stopping the rush. Few were worse than DeAngelo.

Economics

As it stands today, the Redskins are approximately $4 million over the salary cap. As Rich Tandler reported back in November, “[D-Hall] gets a salary bump from $6 million this year to $7.5 million in 2013. [T[he Redskins can release him with two years left on his deal and not have to absorb any dead cap hit.”[i] Just off the top, that takes the Redskins from $4 million in the red to $3.5 million in the black. We’re not accountants, but that seems to be a no-brainer. Now, the inevitable question that follows what seems like a financially rational move is always – (breathlessly) “But, but, who will we replace him with?!” First, let’s just put out there that is maddening that the suggestion of cutting D-Hall must immediately be validated, to those who disagree, by naming his replacement. Our question is – does it really matter?

That segment of fans has already made up their mind. No player that is named will quell the displeasure associated with the thought of a Redskins’ universe that does not include DeAngelo Hall. So, what will naming one do to alter their feelings? Nothing. What we want the Fredericksburgers to answer is, who wouldn’t be better, especially given the cap considerations? As a fan base, we give MWM and the regime so much credit for drafting a guy like The Butler in the sixth-round, yet there’s no faith in the same brain trust to replace D-Hall with a younger, more cap-friendly option? We’re not talking about replacing Darrell Green here.

Then there’s the (breathless) “But, he’s going to re-structure!” crowd. Again, so what? What has he done on the field that still justifies pledging millions of dollars against the salary cap to bring him back? As evidenced by opposing teams’ propensity to consistently throw the ball to his side, DeAngelo Hall is not an elite, nor near-elite corner anymore. He is simply average. Yet, the plan D-Hall advocates support is to pay him millions of dollars, even with a re-structure, to be an average corner. Even foregoing the on-field reasons laid out above, that decision makes zero economic sense.

Overall

So, dismissing the $67,500 in fines, the ejection, and the safety of Mike Jones, let’s just look at what DeAngelo Hall did on the field. He missed 10 tackles. He was penalized eight times, most of them causing damage to the team. He allowed two out of every three passes thrown at the player he was defending to be caught. And he gave up 1,050 yards of offense to our opposition.

There’s no reason that we can’t find someone who can produce better than that at CB and/or FS and save the $7,500,000 owed to DHall.

And think of how much safer all of the PR Slappies will be.

Comments:

Jon
Adam, Hall was in bad position BECAUSE Romo had all that time. If you watch a replay of that play, Hall’s in good coverage for the first 2-3 seconds, in which time the rush should have gotten to Romo. When Dez started ad-libbing, that’s when the coverage broke down and Hall got out of position. Again, expecting ANY corner, let alone Hall, to be in perfect position for the whole play is just unrealistic. You also didn’t bring up any of my other points, regarding this season. You know, like how Hall shut down Bryant in the second Dallas game (BEFORE Bryant’s back started acting up), or that putting the blame on Hall for the Bucs game is asinine when our kicker missed 3 FGs that would have put the game away. But to say that Hall gave that game away, because he allowed a long pass that led to a touchdown? Come on, use some common sense. Or what about saying that Maclin getting 58 yards and no TDs in a loss is a “Banner Day” is ridiculous. As for the AJ Green play: if you go to switch, and the other person doesn’t want to, you can’t just abandon your responsibility and do what you want. And yes, he could have called timeout, but so could have Fletcher, Haslett, or Shanahan, but no one did. We got caught in a bad matchup on the first play of the game. Those things happen. Trying to say that’s on Hall is ridiculous as well.

Kyle
What an absolutely embarrassing article. Does this writer know the difference between zone and man coverage? Apparently not. If you know nothing about football, you shouldn’t be able to write articles about it. Nobody supporting Hall is calling him a “shutdown corner”, but he had a average year despite a pass rush that was non existent and safeties who wouldn’t even be backups for other teams. How is this so difficult to comprehend? Hall will restructure his contract just like everyone else stated and be a viable corner with his new salary.

Mac
All I said was you compared him to Haynesworth, and you did… If I say Lebron James is nearly as good as MJ, I’m comparing Lebron James to MJ, they don’t have to be equal. You compared Hall, to one of the biggest locker room cancers the Redskins have had. Thus I feel your argument continued to grow weaker. Like the author you seem to have it out for Hall, there’s no point in having a reasonable discussion about him with you. If Josh Wilson is as good as Hall, why do the Redskins match Hall up on the #1 WRs more often than not? Just a coincidence in your eyes? Wilson is a descent #2 CB, but he gets burned just like Hall, and there isn’t as high an upside via turnovers with Josh. I personally like them both, and would like to see what the D can do with a pass rush, and NFL level safety play.

skinz49
in his defenae… Pass rush was down and saftys were average… With rac back and fresh upgrades at safty he should be better. Not saying hes gonna be elite but… He did good in 2011 with a good pass rush. HAIL!

Mac
He’s not coming back without taking a pay cut, everyone knows that, most likely it will be cut in half from every report I’ve read. But yes, our #1 cb will still be our highest paid DB. Comparing him to Haynesworth? Your argument grows weaker reply by reply. I suggest you stop now, while you’re not too far behind.

Mac
Furthermore the Browns, and Joe Haden, gave up more yards than Hall..

Mac
So it’s Hall or Haslett’s fault that Gomes waived hall off? Haslett because he didn’t prepare his team? 10 other guys on the field knew how to play that play, 1 guy who was later benched didn’t… This falls on Haslett? Why not Raheem? Who’s in charge of the secondary? Or does Raheem still only get credit on this website? Hall because in a matter of miliseconds he didn’t use his “leadership” to either a.) break away from his assignment or b.)stop time and allow enough time for him to explain to gomes why Hall should have the #1 WR… I mean is this serious? How about the fault falls on the guy who didn’t follow his assignment. Would that be too logical? As far as the rest of that game is concerned. AJ green has 110 yards on Hall, when you take away the play that Hall didn’t cover him. AJ Green averaged 84 yards a game. Hall gave up 26 more yards than the league average, and 0 TDs, despite having 0 pass rush. That’s getting torched in your opinion? That’s one of the best WRs doing what they do, IMO.

brian
i like the fact when he had a good week,you barely wrote a paragraph about it or downplayed it with something else.yet you wrote a novel when he didnt have the best game. and look at the wr’s you named on that list,those guys did that against most corners that covered them!

Chris
The guy is a bum, hands down. NOBODY in the NFL talks as much shit as D Hall when doing absolutely nothing to back it up. If we were paying him 2 million dollars a year, financially it would make sense, but he would still be a selfish, me first guy who throws teammates and others under the bus without a moments hesitation (translation: Bad for the locker room) This guy has done NOTHING outside of one great game in Chicago, a game that Jay Cutler practically gift wrapped for him. I really don’t understand the logic for keeping this fool, just look at his stats and where he ranks in the NFL. Teams throw at him with zero fear. He keeps his eyes in the backfield far too often, cheats and tries to jump routes to make big plays, CONSTANTLY gets beaten by double moves, and simply cannot tackle, no matter the circumstance (Jake Delhomme running through DeAngelos tackle attempt for a game sealing first down in Carolina a few years back jumps into my mind, as well as the instances of him getting dragged down the field, failing to break down, or just plain giving up) In conclusion, DeAngelo is a BELOW AVERAGE CORNER getting paid top dollar. Its a no brainer, release him and dont even think about bringing him back considering we can get someone who will, at the worst be just as below average as he was, for far less money. Good riddance DeAngelo, smell ya when the wind blows.

Kevin Grant
Adam- I understand that pov but don’t think Hall free lancing helps anything. Technically Gomes was suppose to be on Green with Hall on the boundary vs Dalton. Hall noticed the mismatch and made the call to switch with Gomes and was waved off. You have those types of issues when coaches don’t prepare you for the wildcat during a week of practice.

Jon
To start off: the 3rd and 21 was on the pass rush. They couldn’t get to Romo. No DB in the NFL can cover a receiver of Dez Bryant’s caliber for the almost 10 seconds that Romo had to throw the ball. There’s no way that’s on Hall. Most of the stuff you’re using to bash Hall isn’t anything that wouldn’t happen to just about any other CB going up against those receivers. AJ Green, Vincent Jackson, Dez Bryant, Anquan Boldin, Victor Cruz, etc are all top-tier receivers. Just because Hall doesn’t shut them down completely doesn’t mean he’s bad. How does Hall get the blame in the Bucs game? How can you say Hall tried to give it away when Cundiff went 1 for 4? You’re also getting mad at Hall for what *could* have happened in Week 12? If that’s the case, why don’t you just say Hall *could* have allowed 3 TD passes every week and we would have lost those games? Anquan Boldin was already a star. In case you missed it, he did the same thing to the Patriots and 49ers in the playoffs. When is 58 yards and no TDs a “Banner Day” for Maclin? You’re really reaching.

Adam
Kevin. The reason the fan base puts the blame on DHall is because he’s the veteran and leader of our secondary. He should have pushed Gomes over to Dalton on that play, not allow Gomes to just take Green 1 on 1. This speaks to Halls lack of leadership. At worst Hall could have double teamed Green with Gomes and allowed Dalton to catch a pass which probably would have only resulted in a first down, if that. The reason part of the fan base blames Hall on that play is because he didnt step up and be the leader of the secondary. He didnt act like the vet and make Gomes move and he didn’t give good enough effort (along with Gomes) who’s at fault also (but young) in stoping Green from scoring.

Kevin Grant
Mac- I already covered the TD play to AJ Green a few months ago -http://httr24-7.com/uncategorized/film-sessions-cover-0-breakdowns-vs-the-bengals/ . However, there is a segment of the fan base who still puts the blame on Deangelo Hall.

Adam
Mac- I noticed that also, but after that play in which Hall did not make Gomes switch onto Green, Hall stayed on Dalton, Hall had Green most of the rest of the day and failed miserably. There is no reason this franchise can’t find a younger cb just coming into free agency off their rookie contract for cheaper than 8.3 million this year and that player will be “more consistent” than DHall. Hal’s problem is consistency and relying on help too much when he gambles and is burnt. we can’t deal with it anymore if we want to be a Super Bowl caliber team in the near future.

Adam
I can’t agree more! Excellent post on why this franchise needs to dump Hall and find someone younger to take his place that actually cares about defending the wr assigned to him and then cares about tackling the guy should he catch a pass. Hall has his good moments and he has talent, but he’s nearly as bad as Albert Haynesworth in his effort on the field. It’s really sad and I KNOW we can do better as a franchise.

Mac
Stopped reading when you said hall was covering aj green. Play called for hall to cover him, but a safety who was letter benched, waived him off after the motion. Httr, hits another one out of the park..

Adam
The reason I have it out for Hall is that he doesn’t live up to his elite physical god given abilities ala other FA busts this team has signed. Sometimes Wilson does cover the opposing teams #1 wr. The first game in Dallas I saw Wilson on Bryant a lot. When we played Baltimore Wilson shut down Torrey Smith except for a few passes. Flacco picked on the Hall on Boldin match up all game long.

Adam
He’s not nearly as bad as Haynesworth. I didn’t say he was exactly like Haynesworth, you are totally taking my post out of context. I said he’s “nearly” as big as a cancer to the secondary as Haynesworth was to the DL in 2010. Teams feast on Hall and they have for his entire career because he plays lax coverage and gambles too much. Sometimes when he gambles be wins, but more often than not he’s burned and he leaves his safeties out to dry covering a wr all by themselves with Hall yards behind the wr. Hall has good games (like a few a year) where fans like those who want him back are like yeah but he was amazing this week. It’s true, Hall is an elite talent, but he’s not an elite effort guy, technique guy or leader ala Albert Haynesworth. He’s not as bad as Albert was and isn’t quite as much of a malcontent but Hall has his moments also, some of them are well documented in this post. He’s really not worth brining back in my eyes because he’s always lived off his name and the fact that he gambles so much that he will have a handful of ints a year. The problem is that he gets those ints the wrong way. He doesn’t get them like a Revis or Bailey. He doesn’t get them off having coverage like glue where there is no way the pass could be completed. Like I said hall gets his ints by making bad reads and gambling too much and it leaves the safeties out to dry covering a wr by theirself. Now that’s fine if you have Ed Reed or Sean Taylor but we haven’t had a safety that could cover a wr on his own in 6 years now. Josh Wilson isn’t as physically gifted as hall but he plays better. Josh Wilson plays sound technique, he makes pass break ups because he’s close to the wr in coverage. He very rarely has lax coverage and he very rarely is the cb that qbs pick on time and time again. Like the article said, you can’t hide behind the yards given up and especially that every 2 out of 3 times a pass is thrown in halls direction it’s completed. This secondary would be so much better if we just cut Hall and signed a cb who’s better fundamentally but maybe not as talented. Ala a Josh Wilson type. Give me Sean Smith, Chris Houston, Keenan Lewis, Antoine Cason, Leodis Mckelvin, Carry Williams over Dhall. If Hall is back sign Kyle Arrington,Brent Grimes, Tracy Porter, Marcus Trufant, Derek Cox, Greg Toler, Mike Jenkins, DJ Moore, Michael Adams as a #3 and we better draft a cb in round 3 or 4 after drafting a safety also! Hall may be worth what Wilson makes, but not a penny more and our secondary wont improve until he’s totally out of town.

Adam
That’s fine Marc, bring Hall back as our highest paid DB again and I guarentee you the secondary will not improve because he’s nearly as much of a cancer on hhst secondary as Haynesworth was to the DL in 2010.

Adam
Brian there is t much to write about in good weeks other than Hall played well. What are you going to write about exactly? Give an example. The truth is the bad with Hall outweighs the good by a huge amount! It speaks to the huge amounts of inconsistenty which hall plays with and that he’s not worth 8.3 million

Adam
Kevin, I totally understand what happened on that play with Sanu’s bomb to Green, but Ill never accept the fact that our leader of the secondary allowed Gomes to waive him off and take Green 1 on 1. Again, he’s the leader the most veteran of our DBs in our system on the roster. Wether he was waived off or not, is irrelevant. He should have gone to Gomes and pushed him over to Dalton. He could have backed up on Dalton and played over the top on Green, leaving Dalton open to catch a 5-10 yd pass. He could have Freakin Called Time Out!! He did none of those things, he failed in a chance to show he’s a bright player who knows situations right there. Now to get to Jon’s point about Hall’s not at fault vs Dez Bryant. I’ll say this- Hall Deserves Most of the blame! It was a zero blitz, everyone knows that and Romo did a great job escaping the blitz and everyone knows it would be hard for Hall to cover Bryant who’s bigger and stronger 1 on 1. The problem I have is that Hall didnt have good position on the play, Hall then grabbed his face mask making it a 15 yard penalty. Then, as the article said Hall blamed everyone else but himself for not being able to cover Bryant! That shows a lack of leadership. Blaming others, including your coach for when you failed to get the job done. Hall has a history of doing this over his 10 year career with the Falcons, Raiders and now Redskins. This is the biggest problem with Hall. He blames others, doesn’t accept responsibility right away when he messes up and doesn’t have much accountability. I also say that he doesn’t always give his greatest effort. Hall has Champ Bailey type talent. Hall will never be that though because of the lack of leadership, questionable work eithic, effort issues and lack of focus on the field. That’s sad and that’s not worth 8.3 million dollars of Dan Snyder’s $$$ next year.

Adam
John Hall gave up 1045 yds to opposing wrs. 2nd worse in the NFL! That speaks for itself. Adios Hall

At 3-6 Once More, It’s Hard To Think Mike Shanahan Will Be Here in 2014

Last year, when the Redskins stood at 3-6, with the fan base in full “woe-is-us, fire everyone” mode, after a devastating loss to a poor Carolina Panthers team, the players still seemed to have a weird, incomprehensible swagger. While everyone else seemed to be in full blown panic mode, the Redskins themselves seemed calm cool and collected. And then they railed of 7 straight victories like it was nothing, with all the confidence in the world, even when things were at their darkest.

This year, the Redskins sit at 3-6, the fan base is in full on “woe-is-us, fire everyone mode”, after a devastating loss to the 1-7 Minnesota Vikings, and there doesn’t seem to be any of the swagger, any of that confidence. There only seems to be simmering resentment, hurt feelings and a palpable air of pissed-off around everything.

Mike Shanahan has basically never had what one could call a “normal” offseason. In 2010, he was hampered by the expiring CBA and restricted free agency killing efforts to rebuild a 4-12 team with few draft picks to rely on. In 2011, the lockout shortened free agency, and a poor quarterback class left us with Rex Grossman and John Beck. In 2012, he got his franchise quarterback, only to be robbed up important cap space at the very last second.

In 2013, with no first round draft pick and an ailing quarterback who would miss most of the offseason. Mike Shanahan chose to keep as much the same as possible from when the Redskins won the division. Cutting players like Josh Wilson, London Fletcher, Santana Moss, Chris Chester and Josh Morgan would’ve relieved cap space, but he kept him. He re-signed guys like Kory Lichtensteiger and Logan Paulsen and Tyler Polumbus and Fred Davis. He patchworked where had to. He spent his first pick of the 2013 NFL Draft on a corner and two safeties that would likely be thrust into starting roles early. He tried to keep as much continuity as possible.

The coaching staff remained largely unchained, including Jim Haslett, who’s defensive unit had stunk up the first half of the season, but cobbled together a decent second half. The only coach that changed was Ike Hillard, the wide receiver coach, who moved on to Buffalo, who was replaced by Mike McDaniel, who has spent much of his young career coaching running backs, not wide receivers.

Often times what happens to teams who explode one year and fall off a cliff the next is one of two things happens; either you change too much and lose the identity you established, or you don’t change enough, and the identity you established becomes tired and stale, and the same old messages start to fall on deaf ears.

We have reached a crossroads in Mike Shanahan’s tenure as the Redskins head coach that I don’t think can be overcome. No matter what angle you look at it, it’s hard to imagine that Mike can both drastically change the team enough to make a difference, and keep enough the same that it’s not some football form of culture shock.

Aside from Trent Williams, the Redskins don’t have a single, reliable offensive linemen. Tyler Polumbus has improved but is FAR from ideal. Kory Lichtensteiger’s play has falling off a cliff. Will Montgomery went from being to only pass protect and not run block, to being the best at his position at both, to not being able to do either in 3 seasons. Chris Chester is 30 and his play has suffered. Shanahan drafted three linemen in 2012; none of them seem like they’ll play anytime soon. The team views Tom Compton as a left tackle only. Adam Gettis still lacks functional strength. Josh LeRibeus has eaten his was out of what probably would’ve been a surefire starting job.

At wide receiver, other than Pierre Garçon, everything else is a question mark. Leonard Hankerson is a solid if unspectacular number two who will need a lot of strong coaching (i.e not someone who has spent more time coaching running backs than receivers) if he ever wants to be more. Aldrick Robinson is fast and can’t catch anything. Josh Morgan’s numerous surgeries have removed his explosiveness. It’s hard to imagine Santana Moss has much more gas in the tank.

The d-line is all over the place. Barry Cofield has established himself as one of the leagues better nose tackles. Chris Baker flashes. Jarvis Jenkins flashes. But neither performs consistently. Kedric Golston could’ve been cut half a dozen times if not for injuries. Stephen Bowen is always knicked up just a little bit.

London Fletcher’s play has fallen off a cliff. He hit the age wall fast. Perry Riley is great coming down hill and sucky moving backwards. Keenan Robinson has gotten hurt for the second year in a row.

And the secondary is still in flux. D-Hall’s playing the best football of his career, but there’s no guarantee that’ll continue if he’s re-signed. Josh Wilson is average ish, Richard Crawford and Phillip Thomas will be coming off a tough injuries. Amerson and Rambo are bright spots but still raw, as is current practice squad cornerback Chase Minnefield. Reed Doughty will likely be here until the End of Times, but it’s hard to think the same of Brandon Merriweather,

Four years into Mike Shanahan’s rebuild, we, basically, still have to rebuild or at the absolute least tweak most of our units. We even have to rebuild special teams.

The coaching staff is a mess. Jim Haslett’s streakiness has reached the boiling point. Bob Slowik can’t coach his way out of a paper bag, and his inability to do so has hampered the development of Brian Orakpo and Ryan Kerrigan. No one on special teams seems to like Keith Burns.

And the relationship between the offensive coordinator and quarterback (and now, the rest of the offense it seems) is in shambles. Chris Russell reported that if there was a steel cage match, it’s be RG3, Bruce Allen and Dan Snyder versus the Shanahans. My take is something less extreme; essentially, Mike Shanahan is trapped between trying to please his quarterback and ownership, and trying to protect his son.

Dan Snyder has a tough choice to make over the next seven games. Even if the Redskins do, once again, miraculously turn it around, can he honestly give Mike Shanahan an extension?

He can’t let Mike Shanahan play next season as a lame duck. It’s hard to attract free agents with a lame duck head coach, and Shanahan could feel extreme pressure to succeed, which could result in the kind of big name free agent spending spree he’s avoided much of his tenture here. If the team somehow finishes 8-8, or 9-7, hell, even if they finish 10-6 again and win the division, you want to think that you shouldn’t have to keep doing sprints to the finish line in order to make up the playoffs.

Much of the coaching staff and the personnel needs an overhaul. Mike faces the prospect of having to fire his son and find a new coordinator that both jives with his philosophy and that with his ever more political, ever more opinionated franchise quarterback. He faces huge questions about schematic changes defensively.

Basically, if Mike Shanahan stays head coach, he has to rebuild most of the roster again, and this time he’ll have an even shorter leash and shorter time table to do it.

I don’t think Mike Shanahan will be coach of the Washington Redskins next year. It’s got nothing to do with how I personally feel about Mike Shanahan. I think, given the circumstances of his tenure, he’s basically been dealt a bad hand every year he’s been here. But lots of coaches are dealt bad hands. It’s how you overcome those things that makes the difference.

Given how daunting the task ahead is, and given that Robert Griffin III has as much, if not more pull, and given his importance to the team as opposed to Mike’s, I don’t think Shanahan, short of some insane, Giants-esque run to the Super Bowl, is coming back. And I’d hate that, because I do believe he’s a great head coach. But he just might not be the right coach for this team, at this moment.

Which sucks, considering all the work he’s put in to make the team seem less like a laughing stock.

A new head coach allows a fresh start and may breathe a little more air into the team. If the Redskins could find a head coach who also didn’t want to be the general manager, maybe that’d allow our scouts even more freedom to do their job (though arguably they get listened to more with Mike Shanahan than they did with Joe Gibbs, Mike still has the final say). That’d allow the coach to focus more on doing his job (i.e COACHING) while Bruce Allen handled the football operations.

Maybe a new head coach would allow his coaches total autonomy over their units, leaving the defense to the defensive guys and the offense to the guys. Maybe they wouldn’t view certain positions as “entry level”.

It’s a tough head space to be in. It’s not that I want Mike Shanahan gone. I actually don’t.

It’s just that I think if we want to get to the promise land again, he might have to go.

The Story of Meredith Barber, Robert Griffin III’s (Completely Fake, Lying, Fictional) Side Chick

It wasn’t that long ago that Richard Hurd, a 26 year old former member of the Baylor men’s basketball team, tried to extort Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III. The harsh reality of life in the NFL is that one way or another, people will try to exploit you somehow. Luckily for RGIII, Hurd was caught, charged, and received 18 months in prison after his extortion attempt.

Since she didn’t try to extort RGIII personally, Meredith Barber likely won’t have to deal with any jail time. However, she will have to deal with a lot of embarrassment.

Last week, the website Busted Coverage posted a story referring to Meredith Barber as RGIII’s “side piece”, and accused Griffin of texting her on his wedding day. While the story didn’t get much attention nationally (it did wind up on Deadspin), it did cause a mini-panic attack in Redskins Nation over the franchise quarterback potentially cheating on his new bride.

Meredith Barber

Allow me to sooth those fears by telling you that they’re a straight up lie.

Thanks to a lot of tireless work from Richard Bruno (a.k.a @RedskinsRich on Twitter), we have a much clearer picture of here Meredith Barber actually. Namely, that she’s not RGIII’s side piece, but another misguided human being hoping to profit on the kindness of others.

I think it’s fair to say this starts with a friend of Robert Griffin III, William Mallow, and RGIII’s desire to play wing man for his buddy.

It’s Meredith Barber who initiates contact with William Mallow by following him.

Barber follows up contact with Mallow by tweeting that she and Mallow are going to go see RGIII soon, which he retweets. RGIII doesn’t respond.

This is the one tweet that Rich could find with RGIII ever mentioning Barber, and this is just in passing while Barber and Mallow flirt it up.

More flirting…

Still more flirting…

From September through November, Mallow and Barber share these kind of flirty Tweets back in forth. Then, in October, Mallow hooks Barber up with an autographed picture from Robert Griffin III.

Busted Coverage also posted this picture of tickets Barber allegedly got from RGIII —

Intrepid Redskins fans as well as our own LL quickly pointed that the above tickets are not player tickets, but regular season tickets. It’s also fair to think that, given the relationship between Barber and Mallow, the “he” Barber is referring to isn’t RGIII, but Mallow. Below is a complete gallery of conversations between Mallow and Barber on Twitter.

This appears to be a case of RGIII playing wing man for his guy, and one girl getting a tiny bit caught up. Meredith started the wheels turning with what she would later claim was a joke by a friend.

Busted Coverage picked up on the tip, and then started to extrapolate a fictional account of what happened. Barber even initially comes clean about some things.

But it also seems apparent that Barber realized she had something on her hands after Joe Kinsey pushes her a little.

Ask yourself this; what’s a more likely story? That Robert Griffin III, on his wedding day no less, texted Meredith Barber, and Barber then turned around and tweeted about it, blowing her and RGIII’s cover on a whim because she was super jealous?

Or…

That RGIII was just being a good dude for his friend and helping him out by giving her an autograph, maybe Facetiming with her (even though we here are HTTR24-7.com all swear we saw one of those pictures during our run in with a certain red-haired catfish). That William Mallow bought her tickets and used his relationship with Griffin III for his own attempts to date her. And that Barber told a bad joke that got picked up on by Buster Coverage, and upon realizing her situation, Barber saw an opportunity to take advantage?

Barber wasn’t even the only girl Mallow would use his relationship with RG3 on….

In today’s media culture, being first is always preferable to being right. The reason this story gained no traction nationally is because it’d take all of five minutes for another blog to confirm something like this.

Busted Coverage got a hot tip on a potential story, and basically said “screw being right, think of the clicks an ad revenue.” Which is a trait a lot of internet blogs have.

Barber saw the post, and initially probably tried to do the right thing. But once it became clear money was involved, it wasn’t hard for Barber to realize that she could profit off tarnishing Robert Griffin III’s reputation.

Mallow did confront Barber, and he did put his explanation of events out there.

Look I’m going to cut through the BS and just get down to it. We both know that Meredith is looking for attention/money. I know this is what you do for a living and you thought that this would be a golden opportunity but the fact of the matter is that this is completely false. I was with Robert the night in question, and there was zero texting of other girls, much less selfie stomach shots. That isn’t even close to what the bathroom of the suite we were in looked like.

It’s completely unfair to crucify a guy who is a role model to hundreds of thousands of people because all he’s done from day 1 is the right thing. The guy didn’t take a SIP of alcohol during the entire time of the bachelor party in Vegas the weekend before. He’s completely committed and in love with his wife, and would never jeopardize that.

If you want any further information or proof, please let me know. I also have screenshots of Meredith yesterday admitting to me via texts that this was all a joke and that someone grabbed her phone.

As for those Facetime Photos, Rich Bruno explains those as well.

There are five photos attached to the email to help me show and explain to you the method I used while analyzing Meredith’s photos. I took the two RGIII FaceTime photos directly from BustedCoverage, In order to disprove RGIII spoke with Meredith I used Error Layer Analysis which is a part of Image Forensics. Below is an explanation for ELA.

Error Level Analysis (ELA) is an algorithm that evaluates the error level potential of a JPEG image. JPEG is a lossy image format; every re-save degrades the picture. The amount of degradation varies based on the number of saves. The first save loses a lot, the second save loses a little more, and by the 20th save, it is probably as low quality as it will ever get. When a picture is modified, the changed parts have a higher error level potential than the rest of the image. ELA works by saving the picture at a known quality level (like a JPEG at 95%), and then determines how much changed. Edits and splices appear as regions with more change. See the tutorial for more detail.

To summarize, ELA is a method to analyze the distortion or change done to a photo. A photo can degrade by a simple save with more saving leading to more degradation. When you change a photo in Photoshop, you are degrading the original image and adding something with its own respective characteristics. When a photo goes through Photoshop, the changes leave a hidden trail to show what was once done to the image. ELA takes the photo and analyzes it for this error potential highlighting any areas which are effected. The highlights notorious for Photoshop include a rainbow like feature over the image or white noise where an image has undergone a change. In each RGIII FaceTime photo, the white noise corresponding to Photoshop shows up on Meredith’s face and information showing a doctored image. It is not unique to her white face or a white background with some black or consistent pattern included. The images have color yet are completely covered by the white noise. To further prove this, the Busted Coverage logo is also white noise while RGIII and everything else in the image maintains its integrity shown by the black. You can see this in both pictures.

To help explain, I attached Explanation Images 1 and 2. Image 1 is a picture of a Pomeranian which was analyzed and has a resulting all black image showing its original characteristics. There have been no changes to this image.

Explanation image 2 is a Photoshop image of RGIII celebrating with the Lombardi trophy (I can’t wait until this becomes real life in February). The image, sadly, is a fake. You can see in the image how everything in it is black except for the Lombardi and RGIII’s jersey. The jersey was a Baylor jersey changed to Redskins colors.

One last image attached is a FaceTime control used to show the results expressed here are not generic for all FaceTime photos. I took a real life, unaltered FaceTime image and also analyzed it. As seen in the attached image, there is a smooth and consistent pattern. There are no drastic or heavy white signals.

This technique is all about discrepancies and out of the norm items. If an image does not flow smoothly, one can draw conclusions a change has occurred. It does not tell you what type of change or specific details, but if you know what you are looking for, it is perfect. This does prove the images she has provided are fake; therefore, I expect everything else she has yet to reveal to be fake as well.

In addition to what I’ve stated, each picture provided to Busted Coverage lacks its original EXIF data which is a virtual thumbprint. Images lacking this origin data are notorious for being Photoshop projects as well.

For Robert Griffin III, this is an unfortunate lesson on what you can and can’t do with friends. For all intents and purposes, Griff did nothing wrong but try to help friends out, and clearly Mallow was a good enough friend that he was in his wedding party. That being said, sometimes it’s better to exercise discretion, even when you’re trying to hook a homeboy.

For William Mallow, it probably means a little less using his relationship with Robert Griffin III to impress people. Girls that hit you up on Twitter are worthy of a little more scrutiny when you happen to be the very close friend of the guy who is quickly becoming the biggest, most famous athlete in sports.

And for Meredith Barber, the best thing she can do at this point is just come clean. If she’s a real Washington Redskins fan, she knows how much Griff has meant to this city and this team in the short time he’s been here. If she wants to come clean to HTTR24-7.com, I promise I’ll try to be as fair as possible. If she wants to come clean on her own, that’s fine as well.

But she needs to come clean. And quickly.

The Difference Between The Wildcat and the Read-Option (Or, Why Perry Fewell Is Wrong)

“I look at that offense kind of like the wildcat,” Perry Fewell has said about defending the read-option. “The wildcat took us by storm and then until you can see it, understand it; then you can defend it.”

You would think a defensive coordinator with 15 years of NFL coaching experience, not to mention someone that got their butt whooped by the read-option twice, would know better than to say something like he said above. But I suppose he’s not alone in this ridiculous, wrong assumption. Ask a defensive coordinator or defensive minded coach about how to stop the read option, they will almost always bring up how it’s just like The Wildcat; a passing phase that can easily be stopped once it’s seen enough times.

This has been part of the caveman-ish response to teams like the Redskins, Seattle Seahawks, and San Francisco 49ers have a tremendous amount of success running it in 2012. Even the Dolphins were dabbling in it by seasons’ end with Ryan Tannehill. The read-option has been dissed as unsafe for the quarterbacks, a gimmick, and a passing phase, just like 2009 Miami Dolphins taking the world by storm with the Wildcat formation.

The problem with comparing the read-option with the Wildcat, is that they are fundamentally different plays, that work completely independently of each other, with their own separate ways of doing things. Defensive coordinators comparing the read-option with the Wildcat are hurting no one but themselves when it comes to successfully defending it.

 

So, for those of you who don’t know the differences, I’ll explain it for you.

The Wildcat Formation

The Wildcat Formation is an off balanced set where a running back in the shotgun, typically with the quarterback split out wide, and a slot receiver or, as has become popular, a second running back is lined up in the deep slot. At the snap of the ball, the slot back will go in motion. The hope is that the the backfield motion causes confusion, as the defense won’t know if the ball is being handed off to.

In the Wildcat Formation, there are three base plays run out of it, as former Arkansas offensive coordinator explains below.

The Differences Between The Wildcat and the Read-Option

1.) There is no “read-option” in most variations of the Wildcat. Let’s take a brief refresher on what the read-option is.

In the read option, the quarterback is reading the defensive end in a 4-3, or the linebacker in a 3-4. If the quarterback reads the defensive end/OLB continuing his rush upfield to the quarterback, the quarterback hands it off to the running back. If the quarterback reads the defensive end/OLB crashing down the line of scrimmage to chase the running back, the quarterback has the option of keeping the ball for himself and running the football.

This right away gives the read-option a huge advantage over the Wildcat. The Wildcat is a set play call, that will be run regardless of how the defense is aligned, or how anyone of the defense plays the football. In most cases, the running back has no choices on whether or not to keep the football.

 

This, in turn, makes the read-option that much more dangerous. It forces a defense to play slow and have to think rather than react, whereas with the Wildcat, you can still be aggressive. Mainly because of our second bulletpoint.

2.) The lack of a consistent passing threat.

When a team lines up in a Wildcat set, and the quarterback is split out wide, 9 times out of 10, you know that it’s going to be a run coming, and that it’ll likely be going away from the quarterback.

Outside of some trickery like flea-flickers and halfback passes, the threat of the pass when lined up in a Wildcat set is basically non-existent. You can stack 8 in the box again the Wildcat, and as long as you play assignment football, you probably won’t get taken advantage of.

The reason why Russell Wilson, Robert Griffin III and Colin Kaepernick were so successful run the read-option is because they were a legitimate threat to pass the ball. That’s what defensive coordinators like Fewell seem to be be misunderstanding; even if you “stop” the read-option, the thread off the play action pass off the read-option fake is still there.

If you over-commit and rush to stop the run, it exposes the back end of your defense. Scrape exchange is a great way of containing the read-option, until you take the play action passing game into account. It forces defenses to play honest football or they’ll get taken advantage of.

3.) Defenses Never Really “Stopped” The Wildcat

The Wildcat may not be as heavily in use as it was in 2008 and 2009, but the idea that teams “stopped” it is sort of silly.

It’s days as a offense that is used on a large amount of snaps are indeed probably over and done. But it’s not as though defensive coordinators eliminated it from football all together.

What defensive coordinators won’t admit is that most offensive coordinators weren’t looking to build an entire playbook around the Wildcat. For them, it was a wrinkle. Or it was an idealogy that simply didn’t fit their scheme, as Kyle Shanahan explains in this clip from 2009.

The Dolphins were the only team that tried to build an entire offense around the Wildcat, and it just didn’t work. Part of the problem was that they had trouble moving the ball through more conventional means; in 2009, quarterback Chad Pennington’s skillset began to decline, and Chad Henne was solid but unable to get the regular offense going. The Dolphins didn’t have that much talent at receiver either. So teams could, essentially, focus completely on stopping the run game. Trying to incorporate what second round pick Pat White did at West Virginia bombed. And even then, Ricky Williams still rushed for 1,121 yards and 11 touchdowns and Ronnie Brown rushed for 648 yards and 8 touchdowns.

 

By 2010, the Dolphins had improved their receiving core with the addition of Brandon Marshall, Davone Bess and Brian Hartline. Ricky Williams was 33 years old and near the end of the line. Ronnie Brown had broken a his foot in 2009 and was still recovering.

The reason the Dolphins began to utilize the Wildcat less was because (at least on paper), they had a better football team, with more offensive talent, and that moving the ball in the air was more efficient than moving it on the ground.

D-coordinators didn’t stop the Wildcat. The one team that ran it with regularity grew and adapted their offense with time, while other teams weren’t quite as wild about it and didn’t commit to it.

That’s what Kyle Shanahan says in that clip; if you’re to run the Wildcat, you need to commit to it. You can’t do it halfway. The other teams besides Miami that attempted to run it never committed to it. Miami committed to it until they got better.

The league didn’t stop the Wildcat. It just went into hibernation.

The approach defensive coordinators have taken to defending the read-option this offseason only assures me that it’ll continue to be successful going forward. It’s pretty clear that the read-option and Pistol formation have frustrated defensive coordinators. But rather than taking a sound, logical approach, they’re frustration is bubbling over into a silly mentality that this is all a gimmick. It’s denial at it’s best and downright ignorant at it’s worse.

The best way to stop the read-option is to stop pretending it’s a wacky gimmick and start treating it like any other offensive concept. The more d-coordinators like Perry Fewell pretend it’s “just like the Wildcat”, the more they’ll end up looking like dummies when quarterbacks combine for 421 passing yards and 161 rushing yards against them.

What the 2013 Draft Says About the 2011 Draft

Maybe it says nothing. But the picks we made over the weekend have me reflecting on the picks we made in 2011. And I can’t help but wonder if my excitement over the latest additions to the Redskins roster should be tempered when I look back at 2011.

In my opinion we stole Jawan Jamison in the 7th round. He’s not a speedster but I think that’s an overrated trait in 3rd down backs to be honest. Make no mistake, it’s important. But I want someone who can catch passes out of the backfield and be an effective blocker on 3rd down. And those are Jamison’s best qualities.

So, should I be excited that we drafted Jamison…or disappointed that 2011 draft choice RB Evan Royster went from penciled in as the starter last summer to 3rd down back last winter to probably off the roster?

I expected Chris Thompson to be a 7th rounder/UDFA to be honest. His injury history scared me more than his talents excited me. Of course, now that he’s a Redskin I think he’s the greatest thing since sliced bread. The one thing I clamored for on Twitter (follow me @TMM75) was the need for a COP (change of pace back). Yeah, I was the guy pushing for Andre Ellington. Maybe it’s because in my (flag) football days, I was the COP back I have a soft spot for them. Thompson has the speed and big-play ability to be the home-run hitting COP back that will make Kyle Shanahan’s offense even more explosive than it already is.

So, should I be excited that we drafted Thompson…or disappointed that 2011 draft choice RB Roy Helu has been unable (largely due to durability concerns) to hold on the COP back position that Kyle had anointed on him as recently as a January 2012 interview on ESPN980?

Jordan Reed offers a lot of flexibility as a “move” TE. He’s a Fred Davis clone in so many respects, both good and bad. He’s fast, good hands…and a poor blocker. With Davis coming off an achilles injury and one year removed from being a FA, it makes sense to grab a guy like Reed to complement the more “traditional” TE in Logan Paulsen.

So, should I be excited that we drafted Reed…or disappointed that 2011 draft choice WR/TE Niles Paul didn’t show the ability last season to make the transition to TE that the Shanahans envisioned for him and could be nothing more than a special teams gunner in 2013?

I’m higher on Phillip Thomas than most others and not as high on Baccari Rambo. But combined they’re potentially a potent safety tandem. Thomas is extremely versatile, but particularly shines as a solid “in the box” Strong Safety while Rambo plays the single high Free Safety well enough that maybe we can abandon the D.Hall at FS experiment.

So, should I be excited that we drafted Thomas/Rambo…or disappointed that 2011 draft choice S Dejon Gomes has failed to make any real positive impact?

I suppose it’s a little of both. I’m very happy with most of our selections over the weekend (not thrilled with the Jenkins choice). But I can’t help but be a disappointed with the verdict this weekend has seemingly given the middle of our 2011 draft.

T

@TMM75

HTTR Podcast

The Normal Crew is back @HTTR24_7, @TKextremeskins, @SkinsOrNuthin @Sean_Bishop @chris_worthy @TMM75 @JsteelznSkins @JTPartlow21 @MrDCsports have a round table talk about the Redskins, and how the Offense has taken off, lots of Guests call in, very good show

HTTR Podcast Feat Jason La Canfora

The Normal Crew is back @HTTR24_7, @TKextremeskins, @chris_worthy @TMM75 @JTPartlow21 @MrDCsports @OnlyOneSteelz talks with Special Guest from CBS Jason La Canfora joins us and talks RG3, and a Bomb on Cap Gate and the Field